October 14th at The #Indigenous Film & Arts Festival in #Denver, Colorado

An opportunity for interested audiences to see our documentary stateside, in Denver, CO, as part of the annual Indigenous Film & Arts Festival 2019.

We’re pleased to finally make it public, we’ll be screening in Denver, Colorado on October 14th at the Indigenous Film & Art Festival! It’s organized by the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management, and the host organization is History Colorado Center. I very much appreciate having our documentary screened by a Native group in the USA, who recognizes that stories and situations like these for Native North Americans are important, too, even when they are happening abroad. The event itself takes place over several days, with many great films and discussions planned, which are largely open to the public and free of charge.  Please do visit their websites, and try to help support them in the important work.

Please check out their event pages at their site and on FACEBOOK to see the full line up of great films, speakers and presentations.

Tune in June 2nd to Our Interview on #WDR #Zeitzeichen’s Broadcast: “The Indian Citizenship Act”

 

In 1 week! On June 2nd, our interview by Claudia Friedrich will be part of the WDR Zeitzeichen broadcast on “The Indian Citizenship Act”. Make a note to listen in on topics of racism, white supremacist ideology and tokenism, all of which involves Germany’s problematic treatment of Native peoples and cultures today. All intersecting with and part of the rise of normalization of racism and nationalism BIPOC, German and foreign alike, are faced with daily…and which harms everyone. It continues systems of inequality, injustice and oppression.

Sentiments of, “Germany has suffered enough! (due to censure over the European Holocaust). How dare anyone criticize or take away our right to use Natives for self-gratification and teach these practices to our children!” ….Which harms other children. Go figure.

April 26th in #Osnabrueck, #Documentary Screening and Q&A at Museumsquartier-Akzisehaus

 

Opening on 26 January 2019, at the Museumsquartier Osnabrück, is an exhibition on Karl May and the myths and realities of his legacy.

We’ll be screening “Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way” on Friday, the 26th of April 2019 (6 p.m.).

We’ll be providing a critical approach on how the fantasies, myths and racist, colonial behaviors in history and today, have an effect on Native Americans and ALL peoples, as it teaches its okay to be culturally abusive for one’s own amusement…among many other harmful behaviors. Stereotypes: which have been and are the basis of every kind of discrimination, prejudice, oppression and genocide.

Facebook event page and their website link  https://www.museumsquartier-osnabrueck.de/ausstellung/blutsbrueder/.

“Can you #copyright #culture?” Article &Video at dBs Studios #Berlin

From the event March 13, in the on-going series of discussions, dBs Dialogues in Berlin, at the dBs Film & Music School.

Last Wednesday, we came together for the second panel discussion of our diversity-themed season of dBs Dialogues: Can You Copyright Culture? On the panel was award-winning writer, educator, filmmaker and psychologist of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African-American heritage Red Haircrow, whose multimedia work often focuses on identity, indigeneity and intersectionality. He was joined by Dutch producer and veteran of Berlin’s techno scene Charlton Ravenberg and Polish rapper and Creative Music Production & Sound Engineering student Augustyn. The fascinating talk was facilitated by Screen Acting vocal coach, cultural advocate and intercultural negotiation specialist Cavana Hazelton.”

“The Socially Critical #Documentary #Film #ForgetWinnetou! by Red Haircrow”

At MOPO, the Hamburger Morgenpost, “Indianer-Kostüm-Verbot Das sagen die Nachfahren amerikanischer Ureinwohner dazu“… the article on recent controversy where a German kindergarten forbid the usage of “Indianer” or American Indian costumes. The decision by the school has sparked debate across the country on cultural appropriation, “innocent” appreciation and colonial practice equaling racism.

It is ironic that Natives and allies have said so all along, with educational campaigns such as #NotYourMascot and #NotYourCostume, but were largely ignored and minimized. However, when a white European person or group dares to actually behave responsibly and stop culturally abusive practices, there is outrage.

Over a decade ago, exactly as our documentary shared, the American Psychological Association (APA) stated:

“Research has shown that the continued use of American Indian mascots, symbols, images and personalities has a negative effect on not only American Indian students but all students by:

  • Undermining the educational experiences of members of all communities-especially those who have had little or no contact with indigenous peoples. The symbols, images and mascots teach non-Indian children that it’s acceptable to participate in culturally abusive behavior and perpetuate inaccurate misconceptions about American Indian culture.
  • Establishes an unwelcome and often times hostile learning environment for American Indian students that affirms negative images/stereotypes that are promoted in mainstream society.

According to Stephanie Fryberg, PhD, University of Arizona, this appears to have a negative impact on the self-esteem of American Indian children, “American Indian mascots are harmful not only because they are often negative, but because they remind American Indians of the limited ways in which others see them. This in turn restricts the number of ways American Indians can see themselves.”

  • Undermines the ability of American Indian Nations to portray accurate and respectful images of their culture, spirituality and traditions. Many American Indians report that they find today’s typical portrayal of American Indian culture disrespectful and offensive to their spiritual beliefs.
  • Presents stereotypical images of American Indians. Such mascots are a contemporary example of prejudice by the dominant culture against racial and ethnic minority groups.
  • Is a form of discrimination against American Indian Nations that can lead to negative relations between groups.”

Side note: It’s noteworthy that the writer Mike Schlink placed my name in quotation marks, which he did to no other European style name in the article. It was auto-assumed my name was fake or a “nickname” because it was different than the Eurocentric mindset, assumption and judge/jury practice we commonly see when white people come across ethnic or other names. Rather disrespectful and subtly racist, when he could have asked or just treated it as any other name.

March 13th at dBs Music #Berlin – Panelist for, “Can you copyright #culture?”

 

“Our lives, and our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories and histories. More than ever before we have the opportunity to be exposed to, and influenced by, a wealth of different cultures and ideas. But what does that hybridisation mean for culture and how do we avoid a homogenised future? What differentiates appropriation from inspiration; is imitation really flattery? How does an individual navigate these surroundings in the search for authentic artistic expression?

 

Wednesday 13th March, 18:30
dBs Berlin, Funkhaus, Nalepastrasse 18

Join us for this facilitated panel conversation between dBs Students and invited professionals from the creative industries. These are public events.

Dialogue Facilitator:
// Cavana Hazelton
Vocal Coach at dBs Film Berlin, Cultural Advocate and intercultural negotiation specialist
cavanahazelton.com

Dialogue Panellists:
// Red Haircrow
Award-winning writer, educator, filmmaker and psychologist of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African American heritage
redhaircrow.com
forgetwinnetou.com

// Charlton
Producer & DJ
soundcloud.com/charlton-ravenberg

// Augustyn
Rapper, producer, mindful lyricist and student at dBs Music Berlin
soundcloud.com/augustyndoesraps
IG: @augustyn_from_poland

Shared via dB Music Studios Berlin website: https://www.dbsmusic.net/blog/dbs-dialogues-diversity/.

Facebook Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/306475870074006/

EVENTBRITE: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dbs-dialogues-2-can-you-copyright-culture-tickets-55335766768?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

When a #Kindergarten in #Germany says “No Indian Costumes” there’s a fuss, but Natives were ignored for years…

During this time of heightened interest and yelling about challenges to #Indianer costumes and Cultural Appropriation of #NativeAmericans in #Germany. Here are a few links to my past articles, interviews and/or commentary on these and related topics. INSTAGRAM post.

Photos are ones I took from the print version article I received from stern for my contribution to the article, “Im Wilden Osten” (2015). Original photos by Jen Osborne.

More links and articles are listed at my website https://redhaircrow.com/articles/.

New article at OYA on our film, “Vergesst Winnetou!”

For Deutsch speakers, a new article in OYA magazine by Sönke Bernhardi on cultural appropriation and misuse of Native spirituality by the Left, liberal and “eco-movement” groups. It’s titled “Vergesst Winnetou!” and available also for reading at our German website here.

A short excerpt: “Bald darauf entdeckte ich die Subkultur der Gemeinschaftsbewegung und Ökodörfer – und da war es wieder,
das »indianische Erbe« in Form von Redestabkreisen und
Schwitzhütten inklusive Salbeiräucherung. So aufregend
und wohltuend das alles war, drängten sich mir doch weitere
Fragen auf: Was ist mit den »echten« Indianern? Gibt
es sie noch? Was würden sie wohl zu unseren Schwitzhütten
sagen?”

Red Haircrow’s Interview for #Documentary “Searching for Winnetou” Debuts Jan. 28th

Director Red Haircrow appears in the trailer and documentary debuting on Jan. 28th on CBC Docs. It follows Drew Hayden Taylor’s “search” in Germany on the “why” of hobbyism. He was also invited to write a counter-point essay that will be published next week at CBC.

Our film, which is the “flip side”, on natives living Germany, the repercussions and realities of how appropriation and Native stereotypes heavily affects their life, etc. very different from occasional visitors or contract performers, debuts on Feb. 11th. Forget Winnetou- A Documentary Film at the Delphi Theater in Berlin.

15 June 2017-At Institut für Sozialwissenschaften in Berlin: “#RepresentationMatters: Decolonizing Indigeneity”

15 June 2017- Directors Red Haircrow & Timo Kiesel will be at Institut für Sozialwissenschaften at Humboldt University in Berlin, to present “Representation Matters: Decolonizing Indigeneity”. Forget Winnetou.

For more information, please visit its Facebook event page, details in Deutsch and English. The presentation will be in both languages as well.

Headdresses at carnival, childhood games, books sold by the millions for generations: iconic colonial racist imagery such as Karl May’s fictional character Winnetou keeps shaping our distorted images of indigenous North American cultures and histories. Together with author, film maker and psychological counselor Red Haircrow and with Timo Kiesel, film maker (“White Charity” 2011) and member of glokal e.V. we will discuss how representation of indigenous people and First Nations in the Americas and Germany are entangled with the material reality of social inequality and indigenous struggles for sovereignty, environmental justice and survival. The event is bilingual and located on ground level.”



Karnevalskostüme, Kindheitsspiele, Bücher in Millionenauflage seit Generationen: Kolonialrassistische Imaginationen mit Kultstatus wie jene rund um den fiktionalen Charakter Winnetou von Karl May prägen unser verzerrtes Bild indigener nordamerikanischer Kulturen und Geschichten. Gemeinsam mit dem Autor, Filmemacher und psychologischen Berater Red Haircrow und mit Timo Kiesel, Filmemacher („White Charity“ 2011) und Mitglied bei glokal e.V. wollen wir diskutieren, wie fremd- und selbstbestimmte Repräsentation von indigenous people und First Nations in Deutschland und den Amerikas mit der materiellen Realität sozialer Ungleichheit und mit indigenen Kämpfen um Souveränität, environmental justice und Überleben verwoben ist. Der Workshop ist zweisprachig. Der Ort ist ebenerdig zugänglich.”