#CoVid19 Community, Indigenous vs. Western Values & the Inherent Privilege of “Stock up and Ride it Out!”

This all really brings to mind the article I published in Medium last month,“WHEN I THINK ABOUT AMERICA” and that this is  Indigenous values vs. Western values in a nutshell. Being giving/sharing, concerned about community, cooperation vs. competitive, self-centered, taking/saving (while others are in need), skeptical.

The excerpt is from a letter: By Dr. Sharkawy On COVID-19: “I’m a doctor and an Infectious Diseases Specialist. I’ve been at this for more than 20 years seeing sick patients on a daily basis. I have worked in inner city hospitals and in the poorest slums of Africa. HIV-AIDS, Hepatitis,TB, SARS, Measles, Shingles, Whooping cough, Diphtheria…there is little I haven’t been exposed to in my profession. And with notable exception of SARS, very little has left me feeling vulnerable, overwhelmed or downright scared. Mostly, I’m scared what message we are telling our kids when faced with a threat. Instead of reason, rationality, open-mindedness and altruism, we are telling them to panic, be fearful, suspicious, reactionary and self-interested.”

Find constantly update COVID19 Statistics HERE.

Another excellent reality check written by Mike Davis- Not advocating an political position, but this is spot on, THE MONSTER IS FINALLY AT THE DOOR.

“The danger to the global poor has been almost totally ignored by journalists and Western governments. History shows that poorer people and countries suffered most from epidemics. The Spanish Flu of 1918 is just one example.

“The outbreak has instantly exposed the stark class divide in healthcare: those with good health plans who can also work or teach from home are comfortably isolated provided they follow prudent safeguards. Public employees and other groups of unionized workers with decent coverage will have to make difficult choices between income and protection.

Meanwhile millions of low wage service workers, farm employees, uncovered contingent workers, the unemployed and the homeless will be thrown to the wolves.”

To be able to stockpile material goods, one must have savings, money. Money beyond the paycheck-to-paycheck or for us freelancers, with jobs, universities and other venues closing, that can mean we have zero income. As freelancers or those in jobs with less benefits, you have to make the choice between becoming homeless, without even basic necessities and going out to try to find some paying work, exposing yourself to the virus. Just in self-quarantining as suggested, but with little or no food, necessities anyway, especially if you have children or pets, may need medications? That is the reality for millions, and can only increase even if strictures loosen in the next weeks, as the economies of all countries will take a significant hit. So for those saying, “Calm down! Just stay at home.” I’m absolutely sure, you have necessities, you have savings, you have those privileges that help you to better remain calm.

While many of us are not in the demographics currently being affected fatally, the issue of lung damage will remain if you contract and survive covid19. That doesn’t go away. The short-sighted thinking and self-centered “every man/woman for himself”, and that eternal European rationalization “I’m just trying to take care of my family!” while knowingly contributing to behaviors and practices that take or reduce the lives of others…. We’ve seen an upswing in racism, xenophobia and cruelty, there’s no other word for it, in western society in the last couple of decades. What’s happening now is no surprise.

Where I live in Germany, the city I live, in a rather out-lying district, I’ve been out trying to find some goods to get us by. But when you have little money anyway the crazy rush to buy up toilet paper, hand sanitizer and non-perishables isn’t something you can do. While many shelves are empty, and of course, many older people have to go out to get basic goods, many of them too cannot stockpile because it is a matter of not being able to carry many packages home. I’ve seen people of that demo actually being more kind than before. But, honestly, the racism, white supremacist behaviors and privileged ugliness I’ve experienced in Germany has been from the middle-aged to younger generation. Many of whom are convinced they have it harder or as hard as anyone else, including POC, and using the aforementioned mindsets to aggressively go about life offending, lacking empathy, and being self-centered to an absurd but allowed degree. Or conversely, blithely minimizing the very real and serious inequalities others are experiencing, while “improving” themselves using their resources of privilege.

In times of crisis like this, it seems some of the old people haven’t forgotten what it means to have nothing. To be without, and without any hope of relief. Community, commitment to each other, trust, respect, and fellow feeling. Not romanticizing anything, as 20th century German history is a brutal mess of death and trauma, but in my area at least, and thus far, I couldn’t imagine happening here what we see going on in the USA.

For us, because we’ve had such a financial hardship in the last three years when we had to end up producing and funding this film alone, living on the edge, always close to homeless and with little or no prospects? This pandemic is notable, but our daily lives and living hasn’t changed much. Indigenous peoples have already been living in a post-apocalypse for a long time because of European colonization. We keep going on as long as we can, and we know crying doom, saying things like “Life is meaningless” or “It’s just the flu!” nonsense is also privileged behavior.

We are not immune to stress, anxiety, hopelessness and depression, but our values help keep us from giving up and/or harming others. We will still help each other, and others as we can, even when we have little or nothing because we believe that is the right and moral thing to do. To do otherwise, I believe is to surrender your heart, your spirit, and ultimately your life. It is great to know there are people from other cultures and groups, who remember their own collective-focused roots, and reject the self-centered rationalizations of western society as a whole, and which the virus pandemic has clearly revealed.

 

POSTPONED- 23-24 March Seminar in #Berlin – “Becoming and Teaching Human Beings: Critical Indigenous Perspectives”

23-24 March 2020, Red Haircrow will give a 2-day seminar: “Becoming and Teaching Human Beings – Critical Indigenous Perspectives for Daycare, School and Society at Institut für den Situationsansatz (ISTA) in Berlin. Written material will be available in German, with discourse in English and some German.

Registration is still open, but once class limit may be reached, interested persons can add their name to a waiting list. The program is designed for anyone interested in Indigenous perspectives, not just for educators or teachers. You can download the calendar and flyer from their website to share. German description below.

Description

“The tendency to ignore the needs of certain groups to represent themselves is a big problem in western society and continues to adversely affect all our children. How can we change this by incorporating accurate Indigenous knowledge and values into our classrooms and societies?   

 

We provide a brief overview of accurate Native American history, contemporary issues and experiences in German schools as a guide in writing curriculum and planning activities. We outline what inclusion, not appropriation, looks like by presenting culturally appropriate examples and resources.

We provide research on the effects of stereotypes and bias towards Native and other peoples. We answer the question, “What is really learned by children when other cultures and peoples are misrepresented and misused?”

We provide a contrast/comparison model of Indigenous worldview and values vs. Western Society/European values. We discuss the effects of these values on things like gender identity and expression, food and living choices, belief systems and the world around us.

We discuss how humanistic, empathetic values were lost, and how this has affected our educational systems and models. Our focus is to (re)discover these values in ourselves and find the best ways to return these values to our classrooms and societies.

We discuss how to incorporate appropriate Indigenous knowledge and “awakened” practices in classrooms and raise awareness on why culturally sensitive curricula and activities are necessary. We will amplify and share Native voices from around the world to encourage critical thinking and decision making by listening to others, not reading rulebooks. We want to make a support system on a journey to create a better world for all children.”


Deutsch

“Die Tendenz, die Bedürfnisse bestimmter Gruppen zu ignorieren, um sich selbst zu vertreten, ist ein großes Problem in der westlichen Gesellschaft und wirkt sich weiterhin nachteilig auf alle unsere Kinder aus. Wie können wir dies ändern, indem wir genaues indigenes Wissen und Werte in unsere Klassenräume und Gesellschaften integrieren?

Wir bieten Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick über die genaue Geschichte der amerikanischen Ureinwohner, aktuelle Themen und Erfahrungen in deutschen Schulen als Leitfaden in Aktivitäten Lehrplan und Planung zu schreiben. Wir zeigen, wie die Aufnahme, anstatt Aneignung, aussieht. Wir werden kulturell angemessen Beispiele und Ressourcen geben.

Wir bieten Forschung über die Auswirkungen von Stereotypen und Ausrichtung auf Einheimische und anderen Völkern. Wir beantworten wichtige Fragen wie: „Was  wird wirklich gelernt, wenn andere Kulturen und Völker falsch dargestellt und missbraucht werden?“ und „Wie falsche Darstellung der indigenen Völker andere Diskriminierung in der Gesellschaft verbinden?“

Wir bieten einen Kontrast / Vergleichsmodell der indigenen Weltanschauung und Werte vs. der westlichen Gesellschaft / Europäische Werte. Wir besprechen die Auswirkungen dieser Werte auf die Geschlechtsidentität und Ausdruck, Lebensmittel und Lebenswahl, Glaubenssysteme unserer Umwelt.

Wir erörtern, wie humanistische einfühlsame Werte verloren wurden, und wie dies unseres Bildungssystem und Gesellschaft betroffen hat. Unser Fokus ist diese Werte in uns selbst (wieder) zu entdecken, und die besten Möglichkeiten zu finden, diese Werte in unseren Klassenzimmern und Gesellschaften zurückzukehren.

Wir besprechen, wie  man angemessenes indigenes Wissen und „awakened“ Praktiken in den Klassenzimmern übernimmt, und das Bewusstsein darüber, warum kultursensible Lehrpläne und Aktivitäten notwendig sind. Wir teilen Native Stimmen aus der ganzen Welt um kritisches Denken und Entscheidungsfindung zu fördern, indem sie anderen zuhören anstatt Regelbücher  zu lesen. Wir wollen ein Support-Systeme kreieren um eine bessere Welt für alle Kinder zu schaffen.”

The Positive Stories German Media NEVER reports on- Red Haircrow’s Article at #CBC on #NativeAmerican Interest

From my article at CBC​, Native Hobbyism is Modern Colonialism. It’s truth for anyone, but especially for a clearly bogus profile who posted a “too bad you can’t understand (racism) its just appreciation” comment to my page.

EXCERPT: “Some Germans are culturally sensitive
In the midst of this racism, there are positive stories that we don’t hear about either. There are Germans who have learned better ways to appreciate and respect Indigenous cultures. Some have stopped dressing up and practice culturally responsible empathy. They recognize the part that white people have played in the exploitation of Indigenous people and want to stop it in all forms. They use their white privilege to improve intercultural understanding and work with Indigenous peoples on Indigenous terms (for example, the Native American Association of Germany e.V.​).

Not all interest in Indigenous cultures and peoples is exploitative. Even though I am against cultural appropriation, especially in the form of hobbyism, I understand there is a wide spectrum of white Germans who become hobbyists. Some do so out of a desire to escape the capitalistic individualism of western societies and some to make a deeper, healthier connection to the environment.”

New at #DeutscheWelle “Why Germany can’t quit its racist #NativeAmerican problem”

And despite claiming to be open-minded and non-racist, it is no surprise to us that except for one film festival solely dedicated to “immigrant” and refugee issues, not one German film festival, distributor or TV/Media source or outlet accepted or showed interest in our film. Yet many others around the world have done so, and we are pleased to have won the awards and received the screenings we did.

Overall, Germany refuses to face it’s deep and normalized racism. Check the comments sections anywhere this article is posted, and you’ll see Germans (even those claiming to be open-minded and non-racist) vehemently defending racism and racist practice.


Here’s an excerpt, please read the full article at Deutsche Welle: “Across the country, Germans spent the past week celebrating Carnival, known for its parades, drinking, and colorful costumes ahead of the Lenten fast. There is a pervasive attitude that for these five days, Germans can shed their rigid cultural norms and adopt an “anything goes” policy.

Every year, pictures of some of the more racist trappings of Carnival, such as the use of blackface or “Chinese” costumes complete with conical hat, tend to face backlash both from mainstream culture and the country’s growing Asian and Afro-German communities.

However, the same cannot be said of the abundance of “Native American” costumes, a wildly popular choice in a country that has had a robust infatuation with Native stereotypes since the 1800s, made more popular by the works of beloved writer Karl May and his Winnetou character, the archetypal ‘noble savage, ‘and the 20th-century films depicting the character….”

“When I Think About #America” – New Article at Medium – A Personal & Societal Perspective on #Equality #USHistory #Immigration

FULL ARTICLE AT MEDIUM:
“When I think about America, I think of the multi-millions of Indigenous peoples who were killed, who were raped, who had their children ripped from their arms or who died from diseases deliberately introduced. I think of the African peoples torn from their lands, their cultures, their professions and histories, drowning in the ocean, suffocating in a press of bodies, beaten bloody beneath a burning sun, being sold and treated worse than animals. These are my ancestors.

When I think about America, I think of the incoming immigrants, the settlers, the European peoples who were abused, misused, demeaned and struggling in their own homelands, who heard the promise of land and a better life and came. Away from structural oppression and violent conversion that created desperate, vicious souls willing to do anything for wealth and power. I think of the Europeans who incorporated and founded an institution that decided what type of life and which lives were worthy and good, and which others were not. They recreated the systems and structures of elitism, oppression and bigotry they had fled….”

#Radio #Podcast- 8 Dec on Reboot.fm: Que Kenny, Rachel O’Reilly & Red Haircrow on #Colonialism #Fracking

Description from Reboot.fm website.

“INFRACTIONS is an artistic feature documentary in dialogue with frontline Indigenous cultural workers’ struggles against threats to more than 50% of Australia’s Northern Territory from shale gas fracking. It was commissioned by the KW Production Series.
Don’t Frack the NT features a discussion in Berlin with one of the film’s protagonists Que Kenny, with Red Haircrow, and the director, Rachel O’Reilly.

Que Kenny is a Western Arrarnta woman, community support worker and activist from Ntaria (Hermannsburg), 130km west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory, also studying law at Deakin University, Melbourne. She has been involved in grassroots campaigns against the Northern Territory Emergency Response (‘The Intervention’) since 2007, and against Northern Territory gas fracking with the Protect Country Alliance.

Red Haircrow is an award-winning writer, educator, psychologist and filmmaker of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African American heritage. They have an MA in Native American Studies, a Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology and counsel selectively. Special focus of Haircrow’s work includes Native/Indigenous and BIPOC inter-generational historic trauma, Autistic Spectrum Disorder, GLBTIIQ needs and suicide prevention. https://redhaircrow.com/

Rachel O’Reilly is an artist, critic, curator and PhD researcher at Goldsmiths’ Centre for Research Architecture, and theory seminar leader at the Dutch Art Institute. Her artistic work and research have been presented internationally, most recently at Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; E-flux, New York; and UNSW Galleries, Sydney. She co-wrote On Neutrality with Jelena Vesic and Vlidi Jeric, and publishes with Danny Butt on artistic autonomy in settler colonial space. She lives in Berlin.

More info on context and campaigns:

https://www.protectcountrynt.org.au/

Gastivists Home

First Nations on the frontline work hard to protect culture through art and music.
From Infractions, see:

The Sandridge Band, played on RebootFM, also on iTunes:
https://mobile.facebook.com/pages/category/Musician-Band/The-Sandridge-Band-333448726671790/?_rdc=1&_rdr

Dimakarri Dixon, debut album:
https://m.facebook.com/events/fortyfivedownstairs/standing-strong-album-launch/719203481874800/?_rdc=2&_r

 

 

 

4 Dec -#Films Screening Event and Q&A “UNSEEN UNHEARD // The #Indigenous Perspective” in #Berlin

2019 has been extremely challenging, succinctly put. Endeavoring to finish up my next documentary by the end of this year, a shorter work titled, “ALMOST” on reality, identity and Indigeneity,  and the effects of stigma and prejudice. But before that, I have a couple of more screenings scheduled.

On this Thursday, 21 November, in cooperation with Xart Splitta, there’ll be a screening of “Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way”, followed by a discussion with Filipina-German PhD candidate, activist and academic, Karin Louise Hermes.

On 4 December, I’m looking forward to the event being organized by Lada Suomenrinne, a Northen Samí filmmaker and photographer.

Image from Lada

UNSEEN UNHEARD // Indigenous Film Screening.  Program:

Unseen unheard is a selection of films about the indigenous perspective and experience curated by the young Sámi filmmaker and photographer Lada Suomenrinne.

The films by indigenous filmmakers from Norway, Finland and the USA deal with contemporary issues of the First Nations like the fight for land rights and against industrial destruction, decolonization and cultural appropriation. The screening will start at 19H in ACUD STUDIO and will followed by Q&A with Berlin based filmmaker Red Haircrow.

List of filmmakers:

Sunna Nousuniemi- Dissociate (Sámi)
Sky Hopinka- Dislocation Blues (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga)
Elle Márjá Eira & Mai-Lis Eira – The Sámi has rights (Sámi)
Blackhorse Lowe- Shimasani (Navajo)
Red Haircrow- Forget Winnetou! Loving in the wrong way (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee)

FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE

VENUE PAGE 

21 Nov. #Documentary #Screening & Discussion in #Berlin with Xart Splitta & Guest – Karin Louise Hermes

  • Where –  Xart Splitta, Hasanheide 73, 10967 Berlin
  • Time – 7pm-10pm
  • Language– German & English (film & discussion)
  • Cost – Donations accepted
  • Facebook Event page

November is Native American Heritage Month, a national holiday in the USA. But there and here in Germany, the dehumanization and objectification of Indigenous peoples, and the minimization or erasure of historical acts and issues continues. Colonial behaviors and practices that are connected to the most serious, even life threatening problems humanity now faces.

Germany is well known for its cultural appropriation and ideation of American Indians. Misinformation, stereotypes and Eurocentric narratives are widespread. “Playing Indian” as a costume or a lifestyle has been normalized for generations, largely with the help or excuse of Karl May’s work.

Whether one agrees with such practices or not, most don’t recognize it for what it is: #Colonialism2019 and Systemic Racism. Why are Native and Indigenous issues too often left out of conversations on racism in Germany? Why do so many people, even anti-racism or social justice activists continue to tokenize/primitize Indigenous peoples and/or leave them out of conversations on how to survive and create a better world for all peoples?

What truly is intersectional activism and why is it critically important for Indigenous peoples, the history of their treatment and contemporary reality to take stage alongside any and every other action on anti-colonialism, anti-racism and climate crisis? What can you do? What should you do? How can we work together?

We’re going to talk about it on 21 November!


Meet our guest:

Karin Louise Hermes is a Filipina-German academic based in Berlin, Germany. Karin has participated in, organized and reported on many inter-sectional political issues at climate crisis conferences, during direct actions and demonstrations and other endeavors on Indigenous self-representation, ending racism and colonialism. She holds a MA in Pacific Island Studies from the University of Hawai’i, and is a PhD candidate in American Studies at Humboldt-Universität Berlin. One of her articles, “Why I protest“.

#Documentary Screening and Q&A -Why are Native/Indigenous issues too often left out of #racism discussions in #Germany?

Artwork by Natasha John

In cooperation with xart splitta, a screening and discussion at their location in Berlin. Facebook event page.

  • Where: Hasenheide 73, 10967 Berlin, Germany
  • When: 21 November 2019
  • Time: 7pm-10pm

November is Native American Heritage Month, a national holiday in the USA. But there and here in Germany, the dehumanization and objectification of Indigenous peoples, and the minimization or erasure of historical acts and issues continues. Colonial behaviors and practices that are connected to the most serious, even life threatening problems humanity now faces.

Germany is well known for its cultural appropriation and ideation of American Indians. Misinformation, stereotypes and Eurocentric narratives are widespread. “Playing Indian” as a costume or a lifestyle has been normalized for generations, largely with the help or excuse of Karl May’s work.

Whether one agrees with such practices or not, most don’t recognize it for what it is: #Colonialism2019 and Systemic Racism. Why are Native and Indigenous issues too often left out of conversations on racism in Germany? Why do so many people, even anti-racism or social justice activists continue to tokenize/primitize Indigenous peoples and/or leave them out of conversations on how to survive and create a better world for all peoples?

What truly is inter-sectional activism and why is it critically important for Indigenous peoples, the history of their treatment and contemporary reality to take stage alongside any and every other action on anti-colonialism, anti-racism and climate crisis? What can you do? What should you do? How can we work together?

We’re going to talk about it. Guests: TBA.


More about xart splitta: “xart splitta was founded in 2012 and is a non-profit association working in the field of intersectionality, antidiscrimination and (historical) political education. We work interdisciplinary and our formats and offers range from workshops and consultations, art & cultural productions to public discussions, conferences and symposia.”

March 2020 Seminar in #Berlin- “Becoming and Teaching Human Beings – Critical #Indigenous Perspectives for Daycare, School & Society”

23-24 March 2020, Red Haircrow will give a 2-day seminar: “Becoming and Teaching Human Beings – Critical Indigenous Perspectives for Daycare, School and Society at Institut für den Situationsansatz (ISTA) in Berlin.

Registration is open and can express your interest through their online form. The program is designed for every person, not just educators or teachers. You can download the calendar and flyer from their website to share. German description below.

Description

“The tendency to ignore the needs of certain groups to represent themselves is a big problem in western society and continues to adversely affect all our children. How can we change this by incorporating accurate Indigenous knowledge and values into our classrooms and societies? 

 

We provide a brief overview of accurate Native American history, contemporary issues and experiences in German schools as a guide in writing curriculum and planning activities. We outline what inclusion, not appropriation, looks like by presenting culturally appropriate examples and resources.

We provide research on the effects of stereotypes and bias towards Native and other peoples. We answer the question, “What is really learned by children when other cultures and peoples are misrepresented and misused?”

We provide a contrast/comparison model of Indigenous worldview and values vs. Western Society/European values. We discuss the effects of these values on things like gender identity and expression, food and living choices, belief systems and the world around us.

We discuss how humanistic, empathetic values were lost, and how this has affected our educational systems and models. Our focus is to (re)discover these values in ourselves and find the best ways to return these values to our classrooms and societies.

We discuss how to incorporate appropriate Indigenous knowledge and “awakened” practices in classrooms and raise awareness on why culturally sensitive curricula and activities are necessary. We will amplify and share Native voices from around the world to encourage critical thinking and decision making by listening to others, not reading rulebooks. We want to make a support system on a journey to create a better world for all children.”


Deutsch

“Die Tendenz, die Bedürfnisse bestimmter Gruppen zu ignorieren, um sich selbst zu vertreten, ist ein großes Problem in der westlichen Gesellschaft und wirkt sich weiterhin nachteilig auf alle unsere Kinder aus. Wie können wir dies ändern, indem wir genaues indigenes Wissen und Werte in unsere Klassenräume und Gesellschaften integrieren?

Wir bieten Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick über die genaue Geschichte der amerikanischen Ureinwohner, aktuelle Themen und Erfahrungen in deutschen Schulen als Leitfaden in Aktivitäten Lehrplan und Planung zu schreiben. Wir zeigen, wie die Aufnahme, anstatt Aneignung, aussieht. Wir werden kulturell angemessen Beispiele und Ressourcen geben.

Wir bieten Forschung über die Auswirkungen von Stereotypen und Ausrichtung auf Einheimische und anderen Völkern. Wir beantworten wichtige Fragen wie: „Was  wird wirklich gelernt, wenn andere Kulturen und Völker falsch dargestellt und missbraucht werden?“ und „Wie falsche Darstellung der indigenen Völker andere Diskriminierung in der Gesellschaft verbinden?“

Wir bieten einen Kontrast / Vergleichsmodell der indigenen Weltanschauung und Werte vs. der westlichen Gesellschaft / Europäische Werte. Wir besprechen die Auswirkungen dieser Werte auf die Geschlechtsidentität und Ausdruck, Lebensmittel und Lebenswahl, Glaubenssysteme unserer Umwelt.

Wir erörtern, wie humanistische einfühlsame Werte verloren wurden, und wie dies unseres Bildungssystem und Gesellschaft betroffen hat. Unser Fokus ist diese Werte in uns selbst (wieder) zu entdecken, und die besten Möglichkeiten zu finden, diese Werte in unseren Klassenzimmern und Gesellschaften zurückzukehren.

Wir besprechen, wie  man angemessenes indigenes Wissen und „awakened“ Praktiken in den Klassenzimmern übernimmt, und das Bewusstsein darüber, warum kultursensible Lehrpläne und Aktivitäten notwendig sind. Wir teilen Native Stimmen aus der ganzen Welt um kritisches Denken und Entscheidungsfindung zu fördern, indem sie anderen zuhören anstatt Regelbücher  zu lesen. Wir wollen ein Support-Systeme kreieren um eine bessere Welt für alle Kinder zu schaffen.”