Interviewed for “Ich bin kein Kostum!” #CulturalAppropriation #Racism & #Discrimination in #Germany – Airing 13 Feb on #3Sat

Karnevalsverein -De Poller Böschräuber. No copyright infringement intended, please visit the main website accessed from the link in the post.

Airing 13 February 2021 at 19:20, “Ich bin kein Kostüm!” a documentary by Karsen Gravert, ZDF and Tobias Winkler / Kobalt Productions. I was interviewed along with other educators and specialists on the topics of cultural appropriation, discrimination and the real effects of racism, privilege and apathy in Germany. Will it be a hardline based on our commentary or another apologist or “There’s good people on both sides” type of production? We’ll see.

“Sollten sich weiße Schauspieler das Gesicht schwarz schminken? Sollte man Dreadlocks tragen? Sollte man sich beim Fasching mit “Indianer”-Federn schmücken? Nein, sagen Vertreterinnen und Vertreter ethnischer Minderheiten. Karsten Gravert lässt in der 3satKulturdoku “Ich bin kein Kostüm! Die Debatte um kulturelle Aneignung”, am Samstag, 13. Februar 2021, 19.20 Uhr, in Erstausstrahlung in 3sat, alle Seiten dieser Diskussion zu Wort kommen.

Die deutsche Liebe zur Indianerverkleidung reproduziere rassistische Stereotype, sagt der Native American Dokumentarfilmer Red Haircrow. Auch wenn es aus Bewunderung heraus geschehe – ob bei den Karl-May-Spielen oder beim Karneval. Alexander Klaws meint: “Wenn sich mein Sohn als Indianer verkleidet, dann macht er das, weil er das toll findet. Ich möchte mich verkleiden, eine Feder tragen und diese Welt, diese Kultur damit ehren. Wie soll ich bitte meinem Sohn erklären, dass er das nicht darf?”


ENGLISH

“Should white actors put black makeup on their faces? Should people wear dreadlocks? Should people adorn themselves with “Indian” feathers at carnival? No, say representatives of ethnic minorities. In the 3sat cultural documentary “Ich bin kein Kostüm! Die Debatte um kulturelle Aneignung”, on Saturday, February 13, 2021, 7:20 p.m., first broadcast on 3sat, all sides of this discussion have their say.

The German love of Indian dress reproduces racist stereotypes, says Native American documentary filmmaker Red Haircrow. Even if it’s out of admiration, he says – whether at the Karl May plays or at carnival. Alexander Klaws says, “When my son dresses up as an Indian, he does it because he thinks it’s great. I want to dress up, wear a feather and honor this world, this culture with it. How am I supposed to explain to my son that he’s not allowed to do that?”

DO YOUR JOB TO NOT PERPETUATE RACISM AND EUROCENTRISM, AND TEACH YOUR CHILDREN TO BE RESPECTFUL OF OTHER CULTURES AND PEOPLES! It’s NOT HARD.

READ MORE ABOUT THE PRODUCTION HERE.

Now Available in cooperation with #XartSplitta – Communities Thinking InSolidarity – #CommunitiesSolidarischDenken Überlegungen zu nachhaltiger Community-Zusammenarbeit


Now available in German with some quotes in English, in cooperation with xart splitta. In these times more than ever we need empathy, and we all need to work together, those who wish a better world for all peoples. We must continue to educate and disperse vehement defenders of xenophobia and hate who work to divide and even destroy. DOWNLOAD HERE.
#CommunitiesSolidarischDenken Überlegungen zu nachhaltiger Community-Zusammenarbeit.
#CommunitiesThinkingInSolidarity Considerations for sustainable community cooperation.
“2020 ist das Jahr, in dem wir uns bei xart splitta schwerpunktmäßig mit dem Projekt #CommunitiesSolidarischDenken beschäftigt haben. Nicht nur geht es hier um einen Versuch, Community-übergreifend zu arbeiten, sondern auch bewusste Community-Verbindungen zu schaffen. Dazu gehört, Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten in unseren Communities zu thematisieren, um dadurch Handlungsstrategien für Community-übergreifende Zusammenarbeit (weiter) zu entwickeln.”

“2020 is the year we at xart splitta focused on the #CommunitiesSolidarischDenken project. Not only is this about an attempt to work across communities, but also to create intentional community connections. This includes addressing differences and similarities in our communities in order to (further) develop action strategies for cross-community collaboration.”
Read more at the XART SPLITTA website.

Beyond the White/Black Binary of #Racism: #Documentary screening/Q&A on “Forget Winnetou!” -Feb.27th

Join me and a special guest on 27 February 2021, for an online screening & discussion of the documentary, “Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way”. View trailers and other videos at VIMEO.

This event is part of a series by Exil – Osnabrücker Zentrum für Flüchtlinge e.V., titled “Schwartz ist der Ozean”. It starts 15 February and lasts through 6 March 2021. The intersectional themes range from anti-colonialism, decolonization, racism & immigration, with the main goals of increasing knowledge, understanding and desire for people’s of all backgrounds to work together to end hatred, intolerance and apathy worldwide.

The binary of white/black is often the sole focus in Germany, and Natives are too often left out of discussions on racism, repatriation & erasure. This ignores how stereotypes, discrimination & Eurocentrism heavily effect Indigenous peoples, too, especially those who don’t look like the Euro-created stereotype.

This event will take place in cooperation with Volkshochschule der Stadt Osnabrück as Corona restrictions allow. Entry is FREE. Register online at FACEBOOK or by phone through the VHS.


Details

Online Event
Saturday, February 27, 2021 at 7 PM UTC+01 – 9 PM UTC+01
Price: Free · Duration: 2 hr
Public Anyone on or off Facebook
Eine Filmvorführung mit anschließendem Gespräch mit dem Regisseur des Films Red Haircrow

Karl Mays beliebter Pseudo-Indianer Winnetou hat die tatsächliche indigene Bevölkerung jahrzehntelang falsch dargestellt und damit einer weit verbreiteten Aneignung und Ausbeutung indigener Kulturen den Weg bereitet. Menschen indigener Herkunft sind in Deutschland willkommen, jedoch nur, wenn sie die von „Winnetou“ geprägten Klischees erfüllen. Der Film „Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way“ behandelt die Wurzeln von Rassismus, Kolonialismus und kultureller Aneignung in Deutschland von einer selten beachteten Perspektive: die der Native Americans, die von den Deutschen angeblich so geliebt werden.

Red Haircrow ist Schriftsteller, Pädagoge, Filmemacher und Psychologe von Chiricahua-Apache, Cherokee und afroamerikanischer Herkunft. Er hat einen Bachelor in Psychologie und einen Master in Native American Studies von der Montana State University Bozeman.

Nov 30th: “Modern Germany’s Cognitive Dissonance on Racism & its Roots in Karl May’s Legacy” at Brandeis University

In cooperation with the Center for German and European Studies at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, USA, we’ll do an online film screening and discussion with viewers and students on Monday, 30 November 2020.

“Most Americans don’t know who Karl May is, and Germans no longer read his “American Indian” fiction that once inspired generations. Fewer still connect its legacy to persistent “acceptable” racism in all facets of German society, despite research clearly linking the stereotyping of “Others” to the rise of Eurocentrism, normalized intolerance and white supremacist ideology in western society.”

Learn more about the university, this department and its missions and goals at their website.

Repatriation, the #KarlMayMuseum & #Racism in #Germany – Why I had to complete this #documentary #ForgetWinnetou!

6yrs later.

6 years after I was contacted by an American shocked by the fact the Karl May Museum was displaying human remains. Beginning in 2014, I wrote several articles on the situation published at Indian Country Today, the largest Native news outlet in the USA. The work goes on, and some progress is being made but apathy is a constant.

And don’t dare say, “You have to be patient, these things take time”. Why? Because that is solely based on White time and privilege. They don’t need any praise for this either, many treated the topic and Natives shamefully. This is only a first step as there are 1000’s of human remains in German museums that need to be returned, not merely discussed, decided or rationalized by those not from other cultures.

There are multiple 1000’s of important cultural items that were stolen and coerced, often taken from massacre sites that deserve to be with or controlled by those to who they are most important. And YES, there are Native scientists, archaeologists and specialists trained for just these things like anyone else. Native North Americans are often left out of serious conversations on repatriation in Germany, just like they are wrongly left out of conversations on racism.

The continued minimization of stereotypes and hobbyism (by some Natives, too), and the objectification and dehumanization of Native peoples, cultures and histories that is common and accepted in Germany is was what facilitated and kept these human remains away from their ancestral lands and family for so long. There’s apathy but also resentment and outrage that anyone dare challenge German culture (!!) of….racism, which is what appropriation, caricatures, and misrepresentation of Natives and “others” is classified under.

I am very glad the Native nation and families finally will have their relative repatriated, but the length of time and the fact a human scalp had been on display and no one thought about anything about it but “Wow!” until someone finally questioned. A visiting American, who contacted me searching for wider coverage and Native contact on the issue.

Please check out the article at DEUTSCHE WELLE, and the video from 2014 where my interview begins around 3:00. It goes to show how little the topic of racism, Eurocentrism and imperialism are seriously discussed relating to (mis)use of Native peoples, cultures and histories in Germany.

This and other situations somewhat set the stage for me to pursue to completion this documentary FORGET WINNETOU! LOVING IN THE WRONG WAY (2018).


My past articles and appearances on the topic of these human remains:

Karl May Museum Reneges on Agreement to Return #NativeAmerican Scalps

 

 

 

New Interview at Die Tagesspiele – #Rassismus im #Kinderalltag – On Native Stereotypes & Misrepresentation

Online and in print, Rassismus im Kinderalltag :„Yakari löscht unsere Identität aus by Daniela Martens. Der Psychologe und Pädagoge Red Haircrow erklärt, was Federn, Pfeile und Prärie mit Rassismus zu tun haben und wie man mit Kindern über Klischees sprechen kann.

On the topic of racism and the societal self-delusion on the negative effects of stereotypes and misrepresentation of “others”, in particular the fetishized image of the “American Indian”.

My 2011 Essay on #NineEleven, September 11th – A BIPOC Perspective

Click for a larger image

Falling Man by Richard Drew, from the Yahoo UK article

That Day: Nine Eleven, September 11th, 9/11 begins: “Six a.m., and I’d just finished a long night on patrol….”


And ends:
“My lamentation for those lost goes beyond nationalistic or even personal, but down to the root of humanity that empathizes and actually feels the others. That day, it was if a part of my flesh were cut away, and those people were MY people, but I didn’t make it a cause for further hatred and intolerance of others as so many have done.

And for all they died in such terror, I feel a peace for them now. They are all there. They are at rest and don’t have to endure such as we anymore. They will only know joy, however and by whomever or whatever supplies it. That is my belief, so I can embrace them, and though it still can hurt, I am not consumed by agony. Though I hate how they died, I won’t let their deaths make me into something that exists with hate or darkness.

The man who jumped to his death from the building, the one caught by Richard Drew in the photo called “The Falling Man,” made me think of this quote:

“When it comes time to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death, so when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way. Sing your death song, and die like a hero going home.” —Chief Aupumut, Mohican 1725

P.S. 9/11 has become a rallying cry and touch point in modern America, where each may and are required to imagine those last terrible moments for so many, and use it to fuel their convictions. Usually against anything or anyone stereotyped to be Muslim, anything or anyone as a threat to the USA superiority or justice. Yes, heavy irony there.

Wounded Knee, Sand Creek, Jamestown, Staten Island (bet you didn’t even think of that one), Rhode Island, a thousand more, known and unknown in whitewashed history of Native American genocide. As strong and poignant, by nature of our spirits and beings, and because of our connection to each other past and present, be it a hundred years ago or a thousand times thousands, Native Americans don’t forget, especially in that American selective memory, concern and altruism is hypocritical. It’s just another “order of the day”.


For further thoughts on American history, immigration, society and politics, the 2020 article at Medium, “When I Think About America”.

Decolonizing Academia – A Master’s Thesis – “#KarlMay’s Legacy: Czech and German “Indians” vs. #CulturalAppropriation”

Karl May’s Legacy: Czech and German “Indians” vs. Cultural Appropriation by Martin Slezák (2020).

A well written thesis, and one of the few were the author actually added my rightful credentials alongside other academics, and added directed quotes. Many writers who have quoted me in the past fail to add my university credentials, referring to me as just as a blogger or an activist, aka someone just complaining about situations.

In western society, with its elitist Eurocentric system of expertise and worthiness to speak on a topic reserved for mostly white males with university degrees made possible due to centuries of privilege and precedence, failure to add the credentials of a person of color is beyond problematic. Whether a honest omission or not, it is clearly known in academia and society that POC are often ignored or minimized, and only slightly more regarded when compared to European peers, if holding a degree. Degrees almost always attain through far greater hardship, and having to battle structural racism within institutions that see them receive lesser marks for comparable work, lack of support from advisory and university staff, plus the microaggressions of curricula, teachers and other students. We see the effects in academic staff retention but also in hiring practices, which are widely discriminatory for a list of reasons.

There is also a distinct patronizing air towards scholars and universities in eastern Europe as well, particularly from far western Europe and the UK. However, on the topic of Native hobbyism, cultural appropriation and cognitive imperialism, I have experienced far more progressive thinking from the east. I have had many more inquiries from people from Eastern Europe not just seeking resources to learn accurate information, but advice on how they can take actual steps to correct misinformation in their education systems and communities. In Germany, there is still a large amount of defensiveness and attempted justification for racist and neo-colonist practices on all levels of society, from the media to the Kita.

This is just one of the many positive examples.

(Personal photo of a magazine, in which there was an article on Indian hobbyists.)

29 September – At Fachtag “Playing Indian” at MARKK in #Hamburg


On September 29th, I’ll be joining Harmut Lutz (in our documentary, too!) and others on the topic of “Playing Indian” at the Museum am Rothenbaum in Hamburg. I’ll be giving a workshop in the afternoon, which will include select scenes from Forget Winnetou. There is a full-day of discussions and events, please visit the webpage for the current list of participants and check back for updates in August!

Our focus, as ever, is on providing up-to-date, accurate information to help create and inspire positive change in society regarding representation and treatment of Indigenous and other POC, which aids in confronting and ending ableism, sexism and other discriminatory practices in western society.

Here’s a short description from the website, original German below.

“The work of educators, culture/museum mediators, teachers and educators in the German-speaking world is still touched by stereotypical ideas about Native Americans / First Nations: Be it the costumes at carnival times in kindergartens and schools, older literary works such as “Lederstrumpf” and the Winnetou books, current media productions such as the Yakari cartoons or visits to the Karl May Festival: All these practices and ideas leave their mark on educational work. In recent years, the clichés associated with them have been increasingly questioned and criticized – and with the social discourses that have emerged in this way, new challenges for educational work in museums, but also in kindergartens and schools, have arisen.

Under the title “Playing Indian”, borrowed from the classic book of the same name by the US-American author and Dakota Philip J. Deloria, a symposium is offered which is aimed at educators, teachers, museum mediators and educators. The event has three specific objectives: It explains the roots of the “Indian enthusiasm” in Germany in order to better understand phenomena such as today’s carnival costumes. The participants are introduced to diversity-oriented perspectives in the sense of decolonial pedagogy and can design new, contemporary options for action for their work practice under expert guidance.”


Die Arbeit von Erzieher*innen, Kultur/Museumsvermittler*innen, Lehrer*innen und Pädagog*innen im deutschsprachigen Raum wird nach wie vor von stereotypen Vorstellungen über Native Americans / First Nations berührt wird: Seien es die Kostümierungen zu Karnevalszeiten in Kindergärten und Schulen, ältere literarische Werke wie „Lederstrumpf“ und die Winnetou-Bücher, gegenwärtige Medienproduktionen wie die Yakari-Trickfilme oder Besuche der Karl-May-Festspiele: All diese Praktiken und Vorstellungen hinterlassen Spuren in der Bildungsarbeit. Damit verbundene Klischees werden in den letzten Jahren vermehrt hinterfragt und kritisiert – und mit den so aufkommenden gesellschaftlichen Diskursen entstehen neue Herausforderungen für die Bildungsarbeit in Museum, aber auch in den Kindergärten und Schulen.

Unter dem Titel „Playing Indian“ („Indianer spielen“), entliehen von dem gleichnamigen Buchklassiker des US-amerikanischen Autors und Dakota Philip J. Deloria , wird ein Fachtag angeboten, der sich an Pädagog*innen, Lehrer*innen, Museumsvermittler*innen und Erzieher*innen richtet. Der Termin verfolgt drei konkrete Zielsetzungen: Er klärt über die Wurzeln der „Indianerbegeisterung“ in Deutschland auf, um Phänomene wie die heutige Karnevalskostümierung besser einordnen zu können. Die Teilnehmenden werden an diversitätssensible Perspektiven im Sinne einer dekolonialen Pädagogik herangeführt und können unter fachkundiger Anleitung neue, zeitgemäße Handlungsmöglichkeiten für ihre Arbeitspraxis entwerfen.

 

On 29-30 June, Society of American Indian/Alaska Native Psychologists Virtual Retreat & Convention


If you have the time and interest, check out the information for Society of American Indian/Alaska Native Psychologists Virtual Retreat & Convention on June 29-30, 2020.

On the 29th, Red Haircrow will be presentation a module on one of their main research topics: Autistic Spectrum Disorder in Natives & Cultural Competency & Support for all ASD persons.

Please visit the SIP website for details of all keynote speakers, events and topics, which include Native leadership, Indigenous women and incarceration challenges, careers in research and Polynesian psychotherapy practice and methodology.

Here is a brief overview of day one morning session:

  • Stories of Our People: Stepping into Our Identity and Our Sacredness Dee Bigfoot

 

  • Mentoring Through Pandemic and Pandemonium: The Native-to-Native SIP Mentoring Program Stays Nimble and Relevant in 2020 Alberta Arviso, Linda Forrest, Becky Foster, DS Red Haircrow, Brian McNeill & Denise L. Newman

 

  • Indigenous Women Facing Social Injustices Related to Incarceration Kelli Tillquist*, Sharon Houlahan*, Tina Lincourt, & Royleen Ross

 

  • Overview of Human Trafficking: A Call to Action for Mental Health Professionals Christina Tsoi*, Caleb Andreason**, & Matthew Siufanua**