29 September – At Fachtag “Playing Indian” at MARKK in #Hamburg


On September 29th, I’ll be joining Harmut Lutz (in our documentary, too!) and others on the topic of “Playing Indian” at the Museum am Rothenbaum in Hamburg. I’ll be giving a workshop in the afternoon, which will include select scenes from Forget Winnetou. There is a full-day of discussions and events, please visit the webpage for the current list of participants and check back for updates in August!

Our focus, as ever, is on providing up-to-date, accurate information to help create and inspire positive change in society regarding representation and treatment of Indigenous and other POC, which aids in confronting and ending ableism, sexism and other discriminatory practices in western society.

Here’s a short description from the website, original German below.

“The work of educators, culture/museum mediators, teachers and educators in the German-speaking world is still touched by stereotypical ideas about Native Americans / First Nations: Be it the costumes at carnival times in kindergartens and schools, older literary works such as “Lederstrumpf” and the Winnetou books, current media productions such as the Yakari cartoons or visits to the Karl May Festival: All these practices and ideas leave their mark on educational work. In recent years, the clichés associated with them have been increasingly questioned and criticized – and with the social discourses that have emerged in this way, new challenges for educational work in museums, but also in kindergartens and schools, have arisen.

Under the title “Playing Indian”, borrowed from the classic book of the same name by the US-American author and Dakota Philip J. Deloria, a symposium is offered which is aimed at educators, teachers, museum mediators and educators. The event has three specific objectives: It explains the roots of the “Indian enthusiasm” in Germany in order to better understand phenomena such as today’s carnival costumes. The participants are introduced to diversity-oriented perspectives in the sense of decolonial pedagogy and can design new, contemporary options for action for their work practice under expert guidance.”


Die Arbeit von Erzieher*innen, Kultur/Museumsvermittler*innen, Lehrer*innen und Pädagog*innen im deutschsprachigen Raum wird nach wie vor von stereotypen Vorstellungen über Native Americans / First Nations berührt wird: Seien es die Kostümierungen zu Karnevalszeiten in Kindergärten und Schulen, ältere literarische Werke wie „Lederstrumpf“ und die Winnetou-Bücher, gegenwärtige Medienproduktionen wie die Yakari-Trickfilme oder Besuche der Karl-May-Festspiele: All diese Praktiken und Vorstellungen hinterlassen Spuren in der Bildungsarbeit. Damit verbundene Klischees werden in den letzten Jahren vermehrt hinterfragt und kritisiert – und mit den so aufkommenden gesellschaftlichen Diskursen entstehen neue Herausforderungen für die Bildungsarbeit in Museum, aber auch in den Kindergärten und Schulen.

Unter dem Titel „Playing Indian“ („Indianer spielen“), entliehen von dem gleichnamigen Buchklassiker des US-amerikanischen Autors und Dakota Philip J. Deloria , wird ein Fachtag angeboten, der sich an Pädagog*innen, Lehrer*innen, Museumsvermittler*innen und Erzieher*innen richtet. Der Termin verfolgt drei konkrete Zielsetzungen: Er klärt über die Wurzeln der „Indianerbegeisterung“ in Deutschland auf, um Phänomene wie die heutige Karnevalskostümierung besser einordnen zu können. Die Teilnehmenden werden an diversitätssensible Perspektiven im Sinne einer dekolonialen Pädagogik herangeführt und können unter fachkundiger Anleitung neue, zeitgemäße Handlungsmöglichkeiten für ihre Arbeitspraxis entwerfen.

 

The Positive Stories German Media NEVER reports on- Red Haircrow’s Article at #CBC on #NativeAmerican Interest

From my article at CBC​, Native Hobbyism is Modern Colonialism. It’s truth for anyone, but especially for a clearly bogus profile who posted a “too bad you can’t understand (racism) its just appreciation” comment to my page.

EXCERPT: “Some Germans are culturally sensitive
In the midst of this racism, there are positive stories that we don’t hear about either. There are Germans who have learned better ways to appreciate and respect Indigenous cultures. Some have stopped dressing up and practice culturally responsible empathy. They recognize the part that white people have played in the exploitation of Indigenous people and want to stop it in all forms. They use their white privilege to improve intercultural understanding and work with Indigenous peoples on Indigenous terms (for example, the Native American Association of Germany e.V.​).

Not all interest in Indigenous cultures and peoples is exploitative. Even though I am against cultural appropriation, especially in the form of hobbyism, I understand there is a wide spectrum of white Germans who become hobbyists. Some do so out of a desire to escape the capitalistic individualism of western societies and some to make a deeper, healthier connection to the environment.”

#Documentary Screening and Q&A -Why are Native/Indigenous issues too often left out of #racism discussions in #Germany?

Artwork by Natasha John

In cooperation with xart splitta, a screening and discussion at their location in Berlin. Facebook event page.

  • Where: Hasenheide 73, 10967 Berlin, Germany
  • When: 21 November 2019
  • Time: 7pm-10pm

November is Native American Heritage Month, a national holiday in the USA. But there and here in Germany, the dehumanization and objectification of Indigenous peoples, and the minimization or erasure of historical acts and issues continues. Colonial behaviors and practices that are connected to the most serious, even life threatening problems humanity now faces.

Germany is well known for its cultural appropriation and ideation of American Indians. Misinformation, stereotypes and Eurocentric narratives are widespread. “Playing Indian” as a costume or a lifestyle has been normalized for generations, largely with the help or excuse of Karl May’s work.

Whether one agrees with such practices or not, most don’t recognize it for what it is: #Colonialism2019 and Systemic Racism. Why are Native and Indigenous issues too often left out of conversations on racism in Germany? Why do so many people, even anti-racism or social justice activists continue to tokenize/primitize Indigenous peoples and/or leave them out of conversations on how to survive and create a better world for all peoples?

What truly is inter-sectional activism and why is it critically important for Indigenous peoples, the history of their treatment and contemporary reality to take stage alongside any and every other action on anti-colonialism, anti-racism and climate crisis? What can you do? What should you do? How can we work together?

We’re going to talk about it. Guests: TBA.


More about xart splitta: “xart splitta was founded in 2012 and is a non-profit association working in the field of intersectionality, antidiscrimination and (historical) political education. We work interdisciplinary and our formats and offers range from workshops and consultations, art & cultural productions to public discussions, conferences and symposia.”

October 14th at The #Indigenous Film & Arts Festival in #Denver, Colorado

An opportunity for interested audiences to see our documentary stateside, in Denver, CO, as part of the annual Indigenous Film & Arts Festival 2019.

We’re pleased to finally make it public, we’ll be screening in Denver, Colorado on October 14th at the Indigenous Film & Art Festival! It’s organized by the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management, and the host organization is History Colorado Center. I very much appreciate having our documentary screened by a Native group in the USA, who recognizes that stories and situations like these for Native North Americans are important, too, even when they are happening abroad. The event itself takes place over several days, with many great films and discussions planned, which are largely open to the public and free of charge.  Please do visit their websites, and try to help support them in the important work.

Please check out their event pages at their site and on FACEBOOK to see the full line up of great films, speakers and presentations.

Tune in June 2nd to Our Interview on #WDR #Zeitzeichen’s Broadcast: “The Indian Citizenship Act”

 

In 1 week! On June 2nd, our interview by Claudia Friedrich will be part of the WDR Zeitzeichen broadcast on “The Indian Citizenship Act”. Make a note to listen in on topics of racism, white supremacist ideology and tokenism, all of which involves Germany’s problematic treatment of Native peoples and cultures today. All intersecting with and part of the rise of normalization of racism and nationalism BIPOC, German and foreign alike, are faced with daily…and which harms everyone. It continues systems of inequality, injustice and oppression.

Sentiments of, “Germany has suffered enough! (due to censure over the European Holocaust). How dare anyone criticize or take away our right to use Natives for self-gratification and teach these practices to our children!” ….Which harms other children. Go figure.

April 26th in #Osnabrueck, #Documentary Screening and Q&A at Museumsquartier-Akzisehaus

 

Opening on 26 January 2019, at the Museumsquartier Osnabrück, is an exhibition on Karl May and the myths and realities of his legacy.

We’ll be screening “Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way” on Friday, the 26th of April 2019 (6 p.m.).

We’ll be providing a critical approach on how the fantasies, myths and racist, colonial behaviors in history and today, have an effect on Native Americans and ALL peoples, as it teaches its okay to be culturally abusive for one’s own amusement…among many other harmful behaviors. Stereotypes: which have been and are the basis of every kind of discrimination, prejudice, oppression and genocide.

Facebook event page and their website link  https://www.museumsquartier-osnabrueck.de/ausstellung/blutsbrueder/.

“Can you #copyright #culture?” Article &Video at dBs Studios #Berlin

From the event March 13, in the on-going series of discussions, dBs Dialogues in Berlin, at the dBs Film & Music School.

Last Wednesday, we came together for the second panel discussion of our diversity-themed season of dBs Dialogues: Can You Copyright Culture? On the panel was award-winning writer, educator, filmmaker and psychologist of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African-American heritage Red Haircrow, whose multimedia work often focuses on identity, indigeneity and intersectionality. He was joined by Dutch producer and veteran of Berlin’s techno scene Charlton Ravenberg and Polish rapper and Creative Music Production & Sound Engineering student Augustyn. The fascinating talk was facilitated by Screen Acting vocal coach, cultural advocate and intercultural negotiation specialist Cavana Hazelton.”

“The Socially Critical #Documentary #Film #ForgetWinnetou! by Red Haircrow”

At MOPO, the Hamburger Morgenpost, “Indianer-Kostüm-Verbot Das sagen die Nachfahren amerikanischer Ureinwohner dazu“… the article on recent controversy where a German kindergarten forbid the usage of “Indianer” or American Indian costumes. The decision by the school has sparked debate across the country on cultural appropriation, “innocent” appreciation and colonial practice equaling racism.

It is ironic that Natives and allies have said so all along, with educational campaigns such as #NotYourMascot and #NotYourCostume, but were largely ignored and minimized. However, when a white European person or group dares to actually behave responsibly and stop culturally abusive practices, there is outrage.

Over a decade ago, exactly as our documentary shared, the American Psychological Association (APA) stated:

“Research has shown that the continued use of American Indian mascots, symbols, images and personalities has a negative effect on not only American Indian students but all students by:

  • Undermining the educational experiences of members of all communities-especially those who have had little or no contact with indigenous peoples. The symbols, images and mascots teach non-Indian children that it’s acceptable to participate in culturally abusive behavior and perpetuate inaccurate misconceptions about American Indian culture.
  • Establishes an unwelcome and often times hostile learning environment for American Indian students that affirms negative images/stereotypes that are promoted in mainstream society.

According to Stephanie Fryberg, PhD, University of Arizona, this appears to have a negative impact on the self-esteem of American Indian children, “American Indian mascots are harmful not only because they are often negative, but because they remind American Indians of the limited ways in which others see them. This in turn restricts the number of ways American Indians can see themselves.”

  • Undermines the ability of American Indian Nations to portray accurate and respectful images of their culture, spirituality and traditions. Many American Indians report that they find today’s typical portrayal of American Indian culture disrespectful and offensive to their spiritual beliefs.
  • Presents stereotypical images of American Indians. Such mascots are a contemporary example of prejudice by the dominant culture against racial and ethnic minority groups.
  • Is a form of discrimination against American Indian Nations that can lead to negative relations between groups.”

Side note: It’s noteworthy that the writer Mike Schlink placed my name in quotation marks, which he did to no other European style name in the article. It was auto-assumed my name was fake or a “nickname” because it was different than the Eurocentric mindset, assumption and judge/jury practice we commonly see when white people come across ethnic or other names. Rather disrespectful and subtly racist, when he could have asked or just treated it as any other name.

March 13th at dBs Music #Berlin – Panelist for, “Can you copyright #culture?”

 

“Our lives, and our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories and histories. More than ever before we have the opportunity to be exposed to, and influenced by, a wealth of different cultures and ideas. But what does that hybridisation mean for culture and how do we avoid a homogenised future? What differentiates appropriation from inspiration; is imitation really flattery? How does an individual navigate these surroundings in the search for authentic artistic expression?

 

Wednesday 13th March, 18:30
dBs Berlin, Funkhaus, Nalepastrasse 18

Join us for this facilitated panel conversation between dBs Students and invited professionals from the creative industries. These are public events.

Dialogue Facilitator:
// Cavana Hazelton
Vocal Coach at dBs Film Berlin, Cultural Advocate and intercultural negotiation specialist
cavanahazelton.com

Dialogue Panellists:
// Red Haircrow
Award-winning writer, educator, filmmaker and psychologist of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African American heritage
redhaircrow.com
forgetwinnetou.com

// Charlton
Producer & DJ
soundcloud.com/charlton-ravenberg

// Augustyn
Rapper, producer, mindful lyricist and student at dBs Music Berlin
soundcloud.com/augustyndoesraps
IG: @augustyn_from_poland

Shared via dB Music Studios Berlin website: https://www.dbsmusic.net/blog/dbs-dialogues-diversity/.

Facebook Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/306475870074006/

EVENTBRITE: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dbs-dialogues-2-can-you-copyright-culture-tickets-55335766768?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

When a #Kindergarten in #Germany says “No Indian Costumes” there’s a fuss, but Natives were ignored for years…

During this time of heightened interest and yelling about challenges to #Indianer costumes and Cultural Appropriation of #NativeAmericans in #Germany. Here are a few links to my past articles, interviews and/or commentary on these and related topics. INSTAGRAM post.

Photos are ones I took from the print version article I received from stern for my contribution to the article, “Im Wilden Osten” (2015). Original photos by Jen Osborne.

More links and articles are listed at my website https://redhaircrow.com/articles/.