survivalinternational.de – #KulturelleAneignung und das Bild von #NativeAmericans in Deutschland – Gespräch mit Red Haircrow #Video

(After an initial technical issue, dialogue begins around the 5 min mark. )

A discussion on the topic of racism, colonialism, Eurocentrism during the #MayflowersKill campaign (October 2021) at Survival International Germany. Native American stereotypes have been used to misrepresent, misuse and primitize Native Americans and Indigenous peoples. They’ve also been used to hide the European role in their genocide and ethnocide, past and present.

Stereotypes are fear and ignorance based oversimplifications created by those who made themselves dominant through centuries long violence and enslavement, which present incarnation of such behaviors includes systemic racism, discrimination and cultural appropriation. Stereotypes hide and misdirect away from the Truth about Native and Indigenous peoples, their lands and entire continents, whose history has been strategically omitted from western society’s (mis)educational systems.

One of those Truths is: Europeans using modified Christianity as a weapon to first attacked their peers. They committed forcible assimilation, torture and genocide of many of the original Peoples and belief systems in Europe. They especially focused on women, anyone “different”, non-heteronormative or those neurologically diverse. They then took that murderous, thieving show on the road, inflicting horrific violence across the world. They created the concept of race to found the idea of their superiority, and used racism to oppress and enslave. They also normalized sexism, homo- and transphobia, misogyny and ableism in western society. Anyone of their own peers who tried to stop them? They tried to destroy them, too. They routinely destroyed some of the best and brightest of their own who believed in equality and equity for all persons.

So, the systems we fight today, to end stereotyping, colonialism, racism, sexism, ableism, religious intolerance, gender violence and patriarchy, are concepts created to keep a minority in power. Everyone should all be fighting such systems and practices together, not just to help Native peoples, but to help themselves. To help save our world from imperialism, colonization, consumerism and capitalism that continues to foment war, hatred and greed, and is destroying our Earth as we face critical climate crisis.

Facing the reality of what the continued belief in or apathy towards Native American stereotypes is key to understanding yourselves, our shared history and how to end systems of selective abuse, oppression and suppression. For the survival of all our children, for our world.

Our documentary is now available for private use on DVD, view on eBAY. Please save the seller profile as URL changes with restocking.

Universities, organizations and groups, can obtain a digital rental or purchase through Vtape.

Recently in Montecristo Magazine: “The #Frankfurt #BookFair Sheds Light on #Germany’s Strange Obsession with #Indigenous #Culture”

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In a recent issue of Montecristo Magazine: “The Frankfurt Book Fair Sheds Light on Germany’s Strange Obsession with Indigenous Culture”. Red Haircrow was interviewed along with others, on the topics of Germany, Hobbyism and Cultural Appropriation in Writing and Literature, and the oft underlying issues of Eurocentrism, Racism & White Privilege. 

Read the full article at link: “Haircrow says publishers tend to look for “recognizably Indigenous” stories. “It forces the Indigenous person to limit themselves if they want to get published in a traditional way,” he says. “They limit what readers are receiving. It’s a huge disservice to readers and to the writers.”

Interested in screening “Forget Winnetou!”? Contact us for updated info on discussions, panels & organizing


Are you interested in hosting a screening for your organization, school or group? Vtape has a new pricing free for a one-time licensing fee. Please read more at their site, and read our FAQS page for helpful tips.

Vtape is our North American distributor offering us an open contract, we are still searching for a distributor specifically for Germany and Europe so more language options are possible for viewers. We are especially interested in DVD and Blu-ray distributors who offer options for individual buyers.

Red Haircrow, the director, is also available for lectures, discussions or panels on these are related topics. Read more about Mr. Haircrow’s professional background and research, which includes Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intergenerational Historical Trauma. Additionally, other participants in the film may also be available for events.


Our North American distributor, Vtape is an artist run, not-for-profit distributor committed to offering films to help create positive change and greater understanding between peoples. Why? Because the history and lives of Indigenous peoples have been misrepresented, misused and/or overlooked in western society, yet their treatment is indicative of the greatest injustice, inequity and inequality that is still being perpetuated not only against humans but against the earth itself.

“Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way” is an award-winning documentary sharing the voices and perspectives of Natives and accurately informed persons who address these topics and more. Systemic racism, ableism, sexism, white supremacist ideology, Eurocentrism, cultural appropriation. These are all interconnected.

Our film is an honest and direct commentary not only of these issues, but the effects of apathy, minimization and ignoring how defending stereotyping or practices that harm, degrade and “other” continues the cycle of violence and erasure of marginalized and minoritized peoples and groups.

And how do we recreate, revive and renew our Earth, our spirits, our hearts, things that are critically necessary for our worlds survival? First, it is by recognizing, correcting and unlearning centuries of misinformation. Open your eyes. Open your hearts. Be a part of positive change that will benefit us all.

Watch trailers and extra scenes of the film at our Vimeo.

Interviewed for “Ich bin kein Kostum!” #CulturalAppropriation #Racism & #Discrimination in #Germany – Airing 13 Feb on #3Sat

Karnevalsverein -De Poller Böschräuber. No copyright infringement intended, please visit the main website accessed from the link in the post.

Airing 13 February 2021 at 19:20, “Ich bin kein Kostüm!” a documentary by Karsen Gravert, ZDF and Tobias Winkler / Kobalt Productions. I was interviewed along with other educators and specialists on the topics of cultural appropriation, discrimination and the real effects of racism, privilege and apathy in Germany. Will it be a hardline based on our commentary or another apologist or “There’s good people on both sides” type of production? We’ll see.

“Sollten sich weiße Schauspieler das Gesicht schwarz schminken? Sollte man Dreadlocks tragen? Sollte man sich beim Fasching mit “Indianer”-Federn schmücken? Nein, sagen Vertreterinnen und Vertreter ethnischer Minderheiten. Karsten Gravert lässt in der 3satKulturdoku “Ich bin kein Kostüm! Die Debatte um kulturelle Aneignung”, am Samstag, 13. Februar 2021, 19.20 Uhr, in Erstausstrahlung in 3sat, alle Seiten dieser Diskussion zu Wort kommen.

Die deutsche Liebe zur Indianerverkleidung reproduziere rassistische Stereotype, sagt der Native American Dokumentarfilmer Red Haircrow. Auch wenn es aus Bewunderung heraus geschehe – ob bei den Karl-May-Spielen oder beim Karneval. Alexander Klaws meint: “Wenn sich mein Sohn als Indianer verkleidet, dann macht er das, weil er das toll findet. Ich möchte mich verkleiden, eine Feder tragen und diese Welt, diese Kultur damit ehren. Wie soll ich bitte meinem Sohn erklären, dass er das nicht darf?”


ENGLISH

“Should white actors put black makeup on their faces? Should people wear dreadlocks? Should people adorn themselves with “Indian” feathers at carnival? No, say representatives of ethnic minorities. In the 3sat cultural documentary “Ich bin kein Kostüm! Die Debatte um kulturelle Aneignung”, on Saturday, February 13, 2021, 7:20 p.m., first broadcast on 3sat, all sides of this discussion have their say.

The German love of Indian dress reproduces racist stereotypes, says Native American documentary filmmaker Red Haircrow. Even if it’s out of admiration, he says – whether at the Karl May plays or at carnival. Alexander Klaws says, “When my son dresses up as an Indian, he does it because he thinks it’s great. I want to dress up, wear a feather and honor this world, this culture with it. How am I supposed to explain to my son that he’s not allowed to do that?”

DO YOUR JOB TO NOT PERPETUATE RACISM AND EUROCENTRISM, AND TEACH YOUR CHILDREN TO BE RESPECTFUL OF OTHER CULTURES AND PEOPLES! It’s NOT HARD.

READ MORE ABOUT THE PRODUCTION HERE.

Beyond the White/Black Binary of #Racism: #Documentary screening/Q&A on “Forget Winnetou!” -Feb.27th

Join me and a special guest on 27 February 2021, for an online screening & discussion of the documentary, “Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way”. View trailers and other videos at VIMEO.

This event is part of a series by Exil – Osnabrücker Zentrum für Flüchtlinge e.V., titled “Schwartz ist der Ozean”. It starts 15 February and lasts through 6 March 2021. The intersectional themes range from anti-colonialism, decolonization, racism & immigration, with the main goals of increasing knowledge, understanding and desire for people’s of all backgrounds to work together to end hatred, intolerance and apathy worldwide.

The binary of white/black is often the sole focus in Germany, and Natives are too often left out of discussions on racism, repatriation & erasure. This ignores how stereotypes, discrimination & Eurocentrism heavily effect Indigenous peoples, too, especially those who don’t look like the Euro-created stereotype.

This event will take place in cooperation with Volkshochschule der Stadt Osnabrück as Corona restrictions allow. Entry is FREE. Register online at FACEBOOK or by phone through the VHS.


Details

Online Event
Saturday, February 27, 2021 at 7 PM UTC+01 – 9 PM UTC+01
Price: Free · Duration: 2 hr
Public Anyone on or off Facebook
Eine Filmvorführung mit anschließendem Gespräch mit dem Regisseur des Films Red Haircrow

Karl Mays beliebter Pseudo-Indianer Winnetou hat die tatsächliche indigene Bevölkerung jahrzehntelang falsch dargestellt und damit einer weit verbreiteten Aneignung und Ausbeutung indigener Kulturen den Weg bereitet. Menschen indigener Herkunft sind in Deutschland willkommen, jedoch nur, wenn sie die von „Winnetou“ geprägten Klischees erfüllen. Der Film „Forget Winnetou! Loving in the Wrong Way“ behandelt die Wurzeln von Rassismus, Kolonialismus und kultureller Aneignung in Deutschland von einer selten beachteten Perspektive: die der Native Americans, die von den Deutschen angeblich so geliebt werden.

Red Haircrow ist Schriftsteller, Pädagoge, Filmemacher und Psychologe von Chiricahua-Apache, Cherokee und afroamerikanischer Herkunft. Er hat einen Bachelor in Psychologie und einen Master in Native American Studies von der Montana State University Bozeman.

New Interview at Die Tagesspiele – #Rassismus im #Kinderalltag – On Native Stereotypes & Misrepresentation

Online and in print, Rassismus im Kinderalltag :„Yakari löscht unsere Identität aus by Daniela Martens. Der Psychologe und Pädagoge Red Haircrow erklärt, was Federn, Pfeile und Prärie mit Rassismus zu tun haben und wie man mit Kindern über Klischees sprechen kann.

On the topic of racism and the societal self-delusion on the negative effects of stereotypes and misrepresentation of “others”, in particular the fetishized image of the “American Indian”.

The Positive Stories German Media NEVER reports on- Red Haircrow’s Article at #CBC on #NativeAmerican Interest

From my article at CBC​, Native Hobbyism is Modern Colonialism. It’s truth for anyone, but especially for a clearly bogus profile who posted a “too bad you can’t understand (racism) its just appreciation” comment to my page.

EXCERPT: “Some Germans are culturally sensitive
In the midst of this racism, there are positive stories that we don’t hear about either. There are Germans who have learned better ways to appreciate and respect Indigenous cultures. Some have stopped dressing up and practice culturally responsible empathy. They recognize the part that white people have played in the exploitation of Indigenous people and want to stop it in all forms. They use their white privilege to improve intercultural understanding and work with Indigenous peoples on Indigenous terms (for example, the Native American Association of Germany e.V.​).

Not all interest in Indigenous cultures and peoples is exploitative. Even though I am against cultural appropriation, especially in the form of hobbyism, I understand there is a wide spectrum of white Germans who become hobbyists. Some do so out of a desire to escape the capitalistic individualism of western societies and some to make a deeper, healthier connection to the environment.”

New at #DeutscheWelle “Why Germany can’t quit its racist #NativeAmerican problem”

And despite claiming to be open-minded and non-racist, it is no surprise to us that except for one film festival solely dedicated to “immigrant” and refugee issues, not one German film festival, distributor or TV/Media source or outlet accepted or showed interest in our film. Yet many others around the world have done so, and we are pleased to have won the awards and received the screenings we did.

Overall, Germany refuses to face it’s deep and normalized racism. Check the comments sections anywhere this article is posted, and you’ll see Germans (even those claiming to be open-minded and non-racist) vehemently defending racism and racist practice.


Here’s an excerpt, please read the full article at Deutsche Welle: “Across the country, Germans spent the past week celebrating Carnival, known for its parades, drinking, and colorful costumes ahead of the Lenten fast. There is a pervasive attitude that for these five days, Germans can shed their rigid cultural norms and adopt an “anything goes” policy.

Every year, pictures of some of the more racist trappings of Carnival, such as the use of blackface or “Chinese” costumes complete with conical hat, tend to face backlash both from mainstream culture and the country’s growing Asian and Afro-German communities.

However, the same cannot be said of the abundance of “Native American” costumes, a wildly popular choice in a country that has had a robust infatuation with Native stereotypes since the 1800s, made more popular by the works of beloved writer Karl May and his Winnetou character, the archetypal ‘noble savage, ‘and the 20th-century films depicting the character….”

21 Nov. #Documentary #Screening & Discussion in #Berlin with Xart Splitta & Guest – Karin Louise Hermes

  • Where –  Xart Splitta, Hasanheide 73, 10967 Berlin
  • Time – 7pm-10pm
  • Language– German & English (film & discussion)
  • Cost – Donations accepted
  • Facebook Event page

November is Native American Heritage Month, a national holiday in the USA. But there and here in Germany, the dehumanization and objectification of Indigenous peoples, and the minimization or erasure of historical acts and issues continues. Colonial behaviors and practices that are connected to the most serious, even life threatening problems humanity now faces.

Germany is well known for its cultural appropriation and ideation of American Indians. Misinformation, stereotypes and Eurocentric narratives are widespread. “Playing Indian” as a costume or a lifestyle has been normalized for generations, largely with the help or excuse of Karl May’s work.

Whether one agrees with such practices or not, most don’t recognize it for what it is: #Colonialism2019 and Systemic Racism. Why are Native and Indigenous issues too often left out of conversations on racism in Germany? Why do so many people, even anti-racism or social justice activists continue to tokenize/primitize Indigenous peoples and/or leave them out of conversations on how to survive and create a better world for all peoples?

What truly is intersectional activism and why is it critically important for Indigenous peoples, the history of their treatment and contemporary reality to take stage alongside any and every other action on anti-colonialism, anti-racism and climate crisis? What can you do? What should you do? How can we work together?

We’re going to talk about it on 21 November!


Meet our guest:

Karin Louise Hermes is a Filipina-German academic based in Berlin, Germany. Karin has participated in, organized and reported on many inter-sectional political issues at climate crisis conferences, during direct actions and demonstrations and other endeavors on Indigenous self-representation, ending racism and colonialism. She holds a MA in Pacific Island Studies from the University of Hawai’i, and is a PhD candidate in American Studies at Humboldt-Universität Berlin. One of her articles, “Why I protest“.

#Documentary Screening and Q&A -Why are Native/Indigenous issues too often left out of #racism discussions in #Germany?

Artwork by Natasha John

In cooperation with xart splitta, a screening and discussion at their location in Berlin. Facebook event page.

  • Where: Hasenheide 73, 10967 Berlin, Germany
  • When: 21 November 2019
  • Time: 7pm-10pm

November is Native American Heritage Month, a national holiday in the USA. But there and here in Germany, the dehumanization and objectification of Indigenous peoples, and the minimization or erasure of historical acts and issues continues. Colonial behaviors and practices that are connected to the most serious, even life threatening problems humanity now faces.

Germany is well known for its cultural appropriation and ideation of American Indians. Misinformation, stereotypes and Eurocentric narratives are widespread. “Playing Indian” as a costume or a lifestyle has been normalized for generations, largely with the help or excuse of Karl May’s work.

Whether one agrees with such practices or not, most don’t recognize it for what it is: #Colonialism2019 and Systemic Racism. Why are Native and Indigenous issues too often left out of conversations on racism in Germany? Why do so many people, even anti-racism or social justice activists continue to tokenize/primitize Indigenous peoples and/or leave them out of conversations on how to survive and create a better world for all peoples?

What truly is inter-sectional activism and why is it critically important for Indigenous peoples, the history of their treatment and contemporary reality to take stage alongside any and every other action on anti-colonialism, anti-racism and climate crisis? What can you do? What should you do? How can we work together?

We’re going to talk about it. Guests: TBA.


More about xart splitta: “xart splitta was founded in 2012 and is a non-profit association working in the field of intersectionality, antidiscrimination and (historical) political education. We work interdisciplinary and our formats and offers range from workshops and consultations, art & cultural productions to public discussions, conferences and symposia.”