New Trailer, Updates & Team Members

The new trailer for “Forget Winnetou!” is here. Deutsch version can be found at this link. This is the longer, explanatory trailer, but we will do a short teaser (50-59s), too. Thank you to all the participants and constructive feedback, and we look forward to sharing the finished documentary with everyone in December!

NEWS

I’m excited to announce all official filming was completed on 31 July, and project “Forget Winnetou!” has entered post-production stage!

Our funding campaign goal unfortunately wasn’t met here on Indiegogo, but for me, Red Haircrow, this in no way affected my enthusiasm and commitment to finishing the project in a timely way, because I feel it is a critically needed message for NOW. Again, thank you, for the contributions you made.

However, because the campaign goal was not met, former co-director Timo Kiesel decided he could not commit equal time to the project, in favor of other choices. So, the actual documentary film will be directed and produced by me, Red Haircrow. Due to our earlier collaboration, Timo will be listed as associate producer, and will have selective contribution following post-production.

TEAM MEMBERS

I am pleased to announce  the addition of two team members, Johnny Clyde and Viveka Frost. Johnny is Purepecha American, and Viveka has Indigenous Venezuelan roots, both are artists, composers, and filmmakers, part of whose work is listed at IMDb. They are also interviewees for the documentary, who currently reside in Berlin.
 

 

Trailer Selected For Screening at Avanca Film Festival 26-30, 2017

Pleased to announce our Forget Winnetou- A Documentary Film trailer selected for screening at Avanca Film Festival, 26-30 July 2017!

To view our first official trailer, you can do so here.

“What does a world that respects Indigenous peoples look like, that’s working towards ending racism, colonialism, and other intersecting oppression on a global scale?” -Andrea Marcos

Most films about Native Americans focus exclusively on Native experience in North America, however stereotypes of the original peoples of Turtle Island have spread around the world even as more Natives are living or working abroad. And Germany has one of the most notorious and beloved, sometimes fiercely defended symbol named “Winnetou”, a stereotypical American Indian created by German author Karl May in the late 19th century.

Decades later, despite its inherent racism and colonial nature, the heavily Eurocentrized  fictional native and his pseudo Apache tribe are still recreated in films spreading misinformation to new generations. Although surely not the intention, it is still culturally abusive practices that deliberately ignore Natives and others who object, and minimize and/or dismiss multiple research studies on the harm of such behaviors to everyone in society. This must end.

“Just because it’s fiction, doesn’t mean it’s harmless.”

“Reeducating the resistant.”

 Recent promotional interviews: